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Plot:

An American expat tries to sell off his highly profitable marijuana empire in London, triggering plots, schemes, bribery and blackmail in an attempt to steal his domain out from under him.

Also Known As: Gospoda, Gospodje, The, Ha'Gentlemenim, The Gentlemen New, Úriemberek, Джентълмените, Джентльмени, Los caballeros, The Gentlemen, Magnatas do Crime, Dżentelmeni, 紳士追殺令, 瘋狂紳士幫 Hong, Quý Ông Thế Giới Ngầm, The Gentlemen - Senhores do Crime, Bush, Gangsteri cu stil, Джентльмены, Toff, The Gentlemen: Los señores de la mafia

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  • patricia-wright
    patricia wright

    This movie was flawless. A great return to what made him Guy Ritchie. This movie stands right next to Snatch for me. Entertaining from start to finish. He’s done another great job of creating a world of characters you can’t help but watch all in. Bravo. My new favorite Guy Ritchie film.

  • dr-okkas-canberk-duran
    dr okkas canberk duran

    Please don’t rely on what critics have scored, just read their reviews to understand that they have no clue.

  • dale-martin
    dale martin

    In all Guy Ritchie’s crime caper movies there is, perhaps, an amorality and glorification of violence which ordinarily I would find unedifying. But only once, in the morally bankrupt RocknRolla, did this ruin the film and have me booing, metaphorically, at the end; his undoubted talent as a filmmaker has glossed over these shortcomings on all other occasions.The Gentlemen is the latest in the series, written and directed by Mr Ritchie. Matthew McConaughey plays drug lord Mickey Pearson who is looking to sell his British interests, attracting the attention of other underworld figures keen to inherit his thriving empire.Guy Ritchie’s sharp direction and non-lateral storytelling are on top form. The script is crisp and witty, the continual plot twists keep you on your toes. If you feel some of the Mockney dialogue is a little bombastic, well, it’d be like going to watch a Carry On film and then complaining about double entendres – over the top dialogue is what he does; it’s his trademark. And his homage to The Long Good Friday is a nice touch and contains a further surprise.Most of the cast are also on top form, clearly enjoying themselves. Special mention to Hugh Grant playing a seedily odious private investigator-cum-blackmailer. His portrayal is something of a meta joke, channelling his hatred of the British tabloid hacks who have famously pursued the illegal tactics which his character practices. Perhaps the only failure is Henry Golding, in his first role outside rom-com, not quite convincing as a would-be Pablo Escobar. And it’s a shame the excellent Colin Farrell’s role isn’t beefed up more. But these are mere quibbles.The Gentlemen is a fast paced and laugh out loud action movie, an enjoyable holiday treat for adults.

  • jenna-rasmussen-phd
    jenna rasmussen phd

    The best Guy Ritchie and the most Guy Ritchie movie since Snatch. The ensemble cast is a delight and my only complain is that Henry Golding should have had more screen time. There all the perfect ingredients we expect in a comedy crime thriller filled with witty dialogues and twists.Matthew McConaughey finally gets his much need break since Interstellar and he is very convincing as an American expat in London. The screenplay obviously has been influenced by Tarantino’s films like Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction but nevertheless it works. This is the most fun I have ever had in a cinema since Game Night

  • emily-olsen
    emily olsen

    Went to a New Years day performance, best film of 2020 so far for me. The film combined London gangsters, London Youth, wealthy aristocratic types and even asian gangsters seamlessly. The pacing was outstanding, characters interesting and story competent. Go and support this film!

  • dott-jole-longo
    dott jole longo

    Guy Ritchie returns to his story telling ways and it’s brilliant. Charlie Hunnam and Hugh Grant are particularly amazing in this film and have you wanting more. Ritchie is back and I hope he doesn’t leave.

  • douglas-barajas
    douglas barajas

    What a cracker, a joy to watch from start to finish!!

  • ellen-siri-hanssen
    ellen siri hanssen

    The Gentlemen is a return to the London gangster milieu where writer/director Guy Ritchie first made his name with films such as Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Snatch (2000). His first foray into this territory since the disappointing RocknRolla (2008), The Gentlemen comes at the end of over a decade making big-budget studio-backed crimes against cinema. Granted, the film seems stuck in the last decade in more ways than one, it’s highly questionable that the only gay character is a slimy S&M proponent who’ll sleep with pretty much anyone, its token female character barely even manages to rise to the level of tokenism, and Ritchie does absolutely nothing new here – if you’ve seen Lock, Stock or snatch., you’ll know pretty much exactly what to expect – but The Gentlemen is still hugely entertaining. Most of the jokes land, the dialogue is as sharp and expletive-laden as ever, the cast are having a ball, and the self-reflexivity, although a little forced in places, works well for the most part. And yes, the plot is as derivative as it gets, but there’s no denying Ritchie has injected real verve into what looks on paper like an inconsequential C-movie. The Gentlemen definitely won’t change your life, but it will make you laugh.The film begins as sleazy private eye Fletcher (Hugh Grant) arrives unannounced at the home of Ray (Charlie Hunnam), right-hand man to Mickey Pearson (Matthew McConaughey), a suave Oxford-educated American ex-pat who controls a huge marijuana empire in London, valued at around £400 million. Several months prior, Fletcher was hired by tabloid editor Big Dave (the great Eddie Marsan) to dig up dirt on Pearson with the aim to ruin him – Dave’s revenge for Pearson blanking him at a gala. Fletcher has written a screenplay based on his investigation (titled Bush) and tells Ray that unless Pearson pays him £20 million, he will hand over everything he has to Dave. Meanwhile, Pearson has decided to sell his whole operation, but when word gets out, all hell breaks loose, as the various interested parties vie for advantage. Most of the subsequent film takes the form of Fletcher narrating his exploits to Ray, explaining how he learned so much about Pearson and what he does. Along the way, we meet characters such as Rosalind (Michelle Dockery), Pearson’s ruthless and unflappable “cockney Cleopatra” wife, who runs a garage with an all-female staff; Berger (Jeremy Strong), Pearson’s preferred buyer; Dry Eye (Henry Golding), the ambitious but brutal scion of a Chinese syndicate, who hopes to undermine Berger; Coach (a scene-stealing Colin Farrell), who runs a boxing gym for troubled youths and who inadvertently finds himself in the middle of everything; a plethora of property-rich-but-cash-poor landed gentry who are essential to Pearson’s empire; a Russian oligarch; and a street gang called The Toddlers.Aesthetically, The Gentlemen is very much in the mould of Ritchie’s previous gangster movies. Because Fletcher frames his narration as a screenplay, it allows Ritchie to employ a multitude of self-reflexive devices – a smash cut coinciding with Fletcher asking Ray to visualise a smash cut; voiceover transitioning into spoken dialogue; on-screen captions telling us who’s who; animated maps; YouTube fight porn (don’t ask); freeze-frames; rewinds; a shot of film running through a projector etc. At one point, Fletcher is discussing the merits of anamorphic (2.39:1) over 1.78:1, and the film’s aspect ratio changes accordingly. At another, he’s arguing for the merits of 35mm celluloid over digital, saying he likes the grain of celluloid photography, and the film duly switches formats. Such playfulness means that it never for a second takes itself too seriously, with probably the most self-reflexive moment coming towards the end, when we visit Miramax’s offices in London (Miramax produced the movie), and we see a poster for Ritchie’s The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015). All of this is immensely fun, with the more you know about the mechanics of assembling a film, the more humorously self-reflexive the film becomes – Fletcher even acknowledges his own role as an unreliable narrator.In terms of themes, the most obvious is something Ritchie has examined before – the idea that the economic divide between gangsters and aristocrats masks their practical similarities. Pearson straddles this divide; he’s a gangster, but so too is he an aristocrat (in all but name), and the smooth running of his business depends on both classes – the aristocrats who he needs to grow his product (for reasons that constitute a bit of a spoiler, so I’m not going to get into it) and the gangsters who distribute that product. The clash between the pompous insularity of the English upper class and the perceived uncouthness of the lower class has been done to death in both literature (Wuthering Heights (1847) springs to mind) and film (Performance (1970), for example), and although Ritchie doesn’t say anything even remotely new about it, it still forms an interesting textural background – gentrification is ever-present; there are ironic references to the posh areas of Croydon; Ray, a working-class Newcastle native, is a cleanliness freak who eats wagyu steak and lives in a mansion, and when he’s dispatched on a mission to an uncivilised working-class area, he explains he “just hates them junkies,” seeing them as very much his social inferiors.One of the most central scenes sees a group of obnoxious privileged teens holed up in a council flat, whilst on the street below, a gang of machete-wielding delinquents terrorise the neighbourhood. As Ray and his men clash with the gang, there’s a real sense of old vs. new – traditional gangsters fighting it out with internet-savvy hoodlums who don’t give a damn about tradition or respect. There are a lot of laughs to be had with these issues, such as Ray and Coach having problems pronouncing the name Phuc. And again, none of this is presented as even remotely serious.The biggest problems with the film are probably its lack of depth, and the familiarity of the presentation, characters, and milieu – there’s nothing here you haven’t seen in previous Ritchie films. And as you would expect, there isn’t much in the way of emotional maturity or narrative complexity. It’s all very surface-level, and it makes no apologies for such.Nevertheless, I thoroughly enjoyed The Gentlemen. It’s a funny as hell caper and the actors are clearly having terrific fun. It might be formulaic and overly familiar, but it’s also immensely enjoyable.

  • daniel-herman
    daniel herman

    You could practice with your hands for exactly the same amount of hours, but that still wouldn’t make you Liberace. Some people, whether its cooking, tennis, or snooker, seem to put balls in pockets with ease. And so it is with some actors.In this film, High Grant and Colin Farrell shine, and they have some big hitters around them.If you’ve seen a Guy Ritchie film before, you know exactly what you are getting. Fast edits, narrative overlay in slow motion, punchy dialogue with multiple storylines, and this film does the usual. In some ways its directing style detracts from the film as a whole. Static camera, actors on their marks, quick shots, twenty cuts, fast speaking, and Ritchie letting you know you are watching a Ritchie film. But I still like it.And the reason was Hugh and Colin. They shine in every scene, no matter where they are in the shot, you cant help but look at them, If there is a sequel, make it about these two, the Sutch and Bumdance of London, and it will win everything.

  • sophie-pinto
    sophie pinto

    Guy Ritchie once again defines the dark gritty and hilarious antics of gangster LondonI believe fans like myself would be very happy if all of his future projects were of a similar calibre. Guy, I can believe that when you were starting out with Two Barrels that this is what you wanted to do. Keep doing it.Well done Guy, Hugh, Charlie…and everyone elseDoes anyone else think Colin Farrell is an underrated comic genius?

  • miss-tracey-robinson
    miss tracey robinson

    Literally can’t pick a fault with the film, hilarious, great characters, great story line, definitely up there with being one of Guy Ritchie’s best film to date, and a must watch in my opinion

  • monique-li
    monique li

    Guy Ritchie is back in his movie manor of gangsters and plot twists.Hugh Grant is a revelation.Go see it. Nuff Said.

  • ofelia-christiansen
    ofelia christiansen

    The Gentlemen is a wildly entertaining film with a fast paced, enjoyable story that keeps you guessing throughout. The way that Ritchie utilises narration in this film is very clever and is not the heavy handed exposition dump that you might see from lesser quality films. The stellar cast is well credentialed and they all give excellent performances in this movie. A special mention goes out to Hugh Grant, who is far removed from his pigeonholed romantic comedy role to deliver a fantastic performance. The Gentlemen is a great way to start 2020 and I highly recommend giving it a viewing

  • luis-miguel-olmedo
    luis miguel olmedo

    When all the critic reports come out and the inevitable ‘mediocre’ scorings appear don’t be worried: this is a very good film and Ritchie is back to his best.Snatch is a favourite of mine and I must say that this film surpasses it, in story, tone and cinematography. The twists are good, the jokes are great but what stands out are the performances. A ‘star studded cast’ seems to be the highlight of every movie nowadays but let me tell you, the majority of the performances in this film are oscar worthy and pure gold. I say majority of course because Jeremy Strong enlisted one of the worst acting performances I’ve seen this decade!It is by far a better tribute to cinema than that ‘Once upon a time’ nonsense and I urge you to see this film.The only drawback for me is the third act. Too many pipes are introduced late in the film which contributes to a somewhat lacklustre and crammed finale. But apart from that a solid film.

  • hailey-schotte
    hailey schotte

    You can’t take it from him, Guy delivers a gut wrenching yet fun and often laugh out loud British crime flick. The script was an absolute delight with some of the best dialogue I have heard in a very long time, delivered to perfection by all the main cast. It’s a delight having a director and writer like Guy to keep the movie industry fresh, we need more original content like this being rewarded for originality.The cast, well Hugh Grant was fantastic, you quickly realise Grants been underused in films, he has range and this shines through. Colin Farrell too was an absolute standout when on screen, he stole the scenes and had me in stitches. The cast in general though were all brilliant, many many standout scenes.You have to watch this movie, supporting movies like this is important, original content is hard to come by and we need more of it. And trust me, you can’t not enjoy this!

  • adrian-rune-eide
    adrian rune eide

    Richie’s best film since snatch. Hugh Grant gives his best performance. He is simply brilliant , funny, little camp, but deadly. Go and watch ASAP.

  • sebastian-karwan
    sebastian karwan

    I was worried that the best parts of this movie were in the trailer but Oh My Goodness…. it doesn’t even come close. What a treat! I love Guy Ritchie movies but this one was extra special.Hugh Grant was phenomenal and every scene was masterfully shot. Can’t wait to see it again this weekend.

  • jose-miguel-del-cuenca
    jose miguel del cuenca

    At first I thought it started a little slowly but in hindsight it was just right. A perfect execution of a classic British gangster film epitomised by a charismatic Colin Farrell who stole every scene he entered and left me crying out for a coach spin off. All in all very enjoyable classic guy ritchie film.

  • dr-angel-barker-md
    dr angel barker md

    The rather unconventional visionary Guy Ritchie has been stuck in a Hollywood rut for the last ten years, ever since he committed to big budget, visual effects heavy films, such as Sherlock Holmes, King Arthur: Legend of the Sword and this year’s underwhelming live action version of the classic Disney, ‘Aladdin’. The British director goes back to his roots with the highly entertaining gangster film ‘The Gentlemen’ and surprisingly nails every bold punch he makes.Although his ‘Aladdin’ made a ton of money, critically the film was a disaster. His return to the underground world of bribery, drugs, money-laundering and blood-covered-class, is as refreshing as it is entertaining. The film’s script deals with two storylines at the same time, almost breaking the fourth wall with a tongue-in-cheek commentary on today’s Hollywood and how big movie studios are hungry for some original yet overly mainstream basic content, to lure people into cinemas to go watch their films.Beginning with a quick flash forward that ends with a bang and a pair of brains splattered all over a pint and a pickled egg at a typical British pub, we dial it back to a quiet evening at Raymond’s (Charlie Hunnam) cosy house. When private investigator and intrusive sly fox, Fletcher (Hugh Grant), turns up at his house, he explains he has been keeping an eye on the different gangs around town for quite a while. Narrating most of the film and making some stuff up to make things more spectacular for himself, he reads his mostly finished movie script to Raymond, bribing him into funding his little project, or else he’ll leak all the information he has on Raymond’s boss Mickey Pearson (Matthew McConaughey), a white trash American expat who has build himself a marijuana empire.Mickey is tired of the business and is trying to sell his highly profitable company to a dynasty of Oklahoma billionaires. But when one of the underground weed-plantations gets raided by a group of British lads, filming the entire thing and posting it on YouTube as some sort of fight–music-video, it quickly becomes clear some mobster bosses haven’t been exactly honest about their meetings and loyalty towards each other. This is when the real war begins – while keeping it classy.Ritchie co-wrote the story with Ivan Atkinson and Marn Davies, who haven’t written anything before. The idea of the entire film is prodigious, but the screenplay and dialogue is simply unprecedented by Ritchie himself, bringing joke after joke, while taking you on a thrilling ride full of genius twists and new ways to incorporate classic gangster cinema – Ritchie-style. Composer Christopher Benstead is debuting his very first score for a feature film with The Gentlemen, and knows exactly how to set the tone and drive it up to an eleven. A promising talent that won’t go unnoticed.Ritchie introduces new characters throughout the film, keeping the audience on the edge of their seat, surprising them with actual cinema, getting the best angles and money shots, thanks to his cinematographer Alan Stewart (Aladdin). When adding layer after layer to the story, going deeper into the underground scene, adding a new protagonist who’s into human trafficking and Mickey’s queen and wife, the cockney Cleopatra, Rosalind (Michelle Dockery), who owns a sanctuary for the ladies as some sort of business coverup to her husband’s weed-empire, it becomes clear every role has a purpose and there are no extras involved in this story. One of the best acting ensembles in recent cinema history, and a welcome reminder from McConnaughey as to why he won an Oscar in the first place. But it’s Colin Farrell (as the highly entertaining ‘Coach’) and Hugh Grant who steal every scene they’re in with their remarkable wit that’ll for sure land them some BAFTA-nominations.’The Gentlemen’ is a ruthless first-class kick in the teeth. Do not let the failures of Ritchie’s recent career choices scare you, as this is actually one of the best films he’s ever made. Who knew Guy Ritchie could raise the bar not just for himself, but for everyone out there trying to brush him off as a has been. 2020 is off to a great start!

  • tsampika-palaiologopoulou
    tsampika palaiologopoulou

    Every now and again I go to the cinema and watch a film that grabs my attention straight away and keeps it right to the end. This is one of those films. What entertainment! Better than anything else I have seen for a considerable time.

  • alana-barros
    alana barros

    After seeing the film at an advanced screening I was left pleasently surprised. It is one of the best crime films I have watched and the best from Guy Ritchie…even better than Snatch and Lock Stock, which is something.From the acting to the story, cinematography, pacing, dialogue, humour and overall enjoyment I cannot fault it…10/10. Special credit goes to Colin Farrell and his acting.We dont really get movies like this anymore. Movies these days are cheap money grabbers and superhero films. This is a whole different class of film

  • dr-maik-kade-mba
    dr maik kade mba

    Whip-smart 1-2-3 dialogue and film-editing, tension, some seriously laugh-out-loud moments, and a killer unorthodox script equals The Gentlemen.There are a lot of similarities to Knives Out within, but it would be a disservice to say it’s only a Knives Out – Guy Ritchie version, because this film deserves to stand on its own merits.It’s violent, it goes out of its way to be as anti-PC as possible, and its most definitely not for children under the age of 15…but most of all, it’s highly enjoyable. All the performances are excellent. I can’t fault this movie in any way. Maybe it isn’t the bestest movie evar, but I can safely say it will be one of the best of 2020.Charlie Hunnam is legitimately scary. McConaughey nails his role. Colin Farrell has a great comedic role. All the accents are spot on. Please give me more of this.

  • malle-ilves
    malle ilves

    It’s Guy Ritchies Best since Snatch, it’s where he is most playful and comfortable in a film genre he knows well. The Cast is perfectly picked, especially Hugh Grant giving a different but yet so funny performance. Sit back and enjoy 2 hours of a British crime drama, which doesn’t take itself too serious If we hadn’t had lock stock or snatch then this would possibly looked at in a more classic Ritchie film so don’t expect it to be as great as those.

  • rasa-vsiliauskas
    rasa vsiliauskas

    The writing, directing, acting and the general production are all top notch. I have not had this much fun watching a movie in a long time. This will go down as a cult classic, so do not miss it.

  • gustaw-palen
    gustaw palen

    Has there ever been a bad performance in a Guy Ritchie movie? If there has I haven’t noticed it. He has an ornate ability to take average actors and make them great, and to take already great actors and get even more out of them. There are a few directors around who specialise in this but Ritchie is right near the top. The cast in ‘The Gentlemen’ is admittedly fantastic, but it doesn’t change the fact that they are an absolute treat to watch. Matthew McConaughey is in his element in a role that he was born to play, Charlie Hunnam plays one of the coolest characters I’ve seen perfectly, Colin Farrell is hilarious and ridiculously cool as well and then Hugh Grant gives one of the best performances I’ve ever seen from him. In fact Grant was so good I didn’t even recognise his voice and had to wonder if they’d dubbed it. They hadn’t, he’d just nailed it.The style this movie possesses is just so much fun to watch. If you’ve seen any of Ritchie’s previous similar films (‘Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels’, ‘Snatch’, ‘RocknRolla’) then you know what I’m talking about. The pacing moves at lightning speed, the dialogue is quick, clever and deeper than you first realise and the conflict is always multi-layered. This one is actually told in quite a unique way with a couple of characters going over events that have already happened and it works masterfully. It breaks the story up and gives room for creativity in the story-telling process and also humour.Every time I see that Ritchie has made a movie that isn’t a crime-thriller I get a little disappointed. It’s not that the other stuff he’s doing is bad (‘Swept Away’ being an obvious exception), it’s just that he is so damn good as this style of movie. He’s the best in the business and if he only did these for the rest of his career I’d be a very happy man. This is an excellent movie well worth your time and money.