Loading...

Plot:

This is a story about the biggest financial fraud attempted in Hong Kong, directed at the Government of Hong Kong and involved all 7 million Hong Kong citizens… no one is free from the scheme. Within the four decades of guarding Hong Kong’s financial integrity, the ICAC has never come across an opponent so huge and so well organized as in the Z Torrent file… shadowy figures from the underworld of South America, Italy and Europe all ready to plot against the estimated 150 million dollars of Hong Kong citizens’ tax money which was pooled in a fund called the WELFARE FUND. High profile chartered accountants, high ranking law enforcers, power lawyers, the super entrepreneurs; they all have their shares of play but none can really grasp the big picture; they are there only for what they desire most. When the wife of an up-rising star Superintendent of police force reported his corruption simply out of bitterness for being ill-treated, little did she know she is about to pull the head string from a very well weaved web of deceive, greed, sex, power, and last but not least, fear. The ICAC agent LOK who took charge of the simple complaint felt otherwise… it’s his passion for justice that has been driving him all these years in the battle against bribery and corruption, even after losing his beloved wife. Further investigation soon revealed many unanswered questions and loose ends…the death of an ex-godfather status accountant of Hong Kong, the threats to even the seemingly harmless witnesses and informers, and the surfacing of a mysterious lady that has all connection with LOK’s wanted list but with a background as simple and as tragic as a girl next door with terminal illness… As Lok dug deeper into the web, he is being hunted by trained foreign mercenaries; a tactic very seldom or never heard of in the history of Hong Kong’s underworld! With the support of his superior the old but streetwise Deputy Chief of ICAC, Lok eventually unlocked the door to the plan, but only after a bloodbath gun battle that almost cost him his life and that of the attractive mysterious woman, Angel.

Also Known As: 'Z' fung bou, Fan tan feng bao, Z fung bou Hong, Z Storm, Z fung wan

Leave a Reply

No Comments

  • mirjami-pirinen-savolainen
    mirjami pirinen savolainen

    Z STORM is an oddly lacklustre cop thriller starring the one and only Louis Koo, who sometimes feels like an extra in his own movie. This one’s a story of financial corruption and mismanagement, in some ways a throwback to the 1980s with the presence of the ever-slick (and seemingly ageless) Michael Wong as the villain of the hour. Sadly, as a thriller it doesn’t really work at all, given that it almost entirely lacks thrills. There’s barely any action, apart from a couple of minor bits at the end, and instead the whole production is bogged down in small talk and melodrama between extraneous female and interchangeable male characters. In many ways this feels like a mainland China movie rather than one from Hong Kong, so I wonder how much influence there was there. It’s one of the rare cases in which the sequel, S STORM, is (slightly, at least) better than the original.

  • megi-margvelashvili
    megi margvelashvili

    Yes the movie is quite predictable and you may find yourself wondering why certain elements are not being exploited earlier in the movie. Having said that there are quite a few fun performances here. And when I say fun I mean good ones. If you are familiar with Hong Kong cinema, you may even recognize some of the actors.It’s an action thriller and based on that (rating or looking at the stunts), this is a success. This is not Shakespeare or high drama (although it does contain some amount of that too of course), but something that can be a rollercoaster ride. A good versus evil theme, even if some of the bad ones are disguised as “good people”. This is not Infernal Affairs, but not every movie can be that. That doesn’t take anything away from the entertainment this can provide

  • simon-eromenko
    simon eromenko

    This film tells the story of several anti corruption agents who are hot in the tails of a corrupt policeman. They soon discover that the corruption scandal involves a very wide and powerful network, but they tirelessly try to fight against the odds.”Z Storm” has a stellar cast, but a semi intriguing story. I’m sure the filmmakers tried hard to make a thrilling film, but the end result is not as thrilling as hoped. Some scenes look like an over acted soap opera, such as the private investigator and the cancer survivor. These scenes are perhaps there to entertain viewers, but I don’t find them entertaining, but distracting and subtracting the film from suspense and thrill. The film looks more like a propaganda film for ICAC, than a thrilling drama been two different law enforcement agencies.

  • simas-gintalas
    simas gintalas

    Very detailed criminalogy, you can just go on and watch again and again.

  • janet-shah
    janet shah

    My sequence in seeing this anti corruption series is proved to be correct. This first one is the most entertaining. The fast moving pace of the story makes the movie exciting. Acting of leads are above standard. I have virtually no complaint on the movie, except that Chan, as a suspected bribed senior police officer, could be so powerful.My feeling on commentary of the series is intensely underrated. Especially this first one is actually very entertaining. But I just cannot figure out why the rate of IMDB and professional critics is so low. To me, I recommend especially to the Mainland watchers to boost their sense of anti corruption.

  • matthew-orchard-brown
    matthew orchard brown

    Just when we thought the Hong Kong movie-making industry was making a rebound, along comes a disappointment like ‘Z Storm’ to give us pause. There’s no doubt about it; the financial thriller is a huge letdown – not only is it because it had been touted as one of the most highly anticipated blockbusters of 2014, but also because of its pedigree (John Chong of ‘Infernal Affairs’ is credited as the sole producer) and its big-name cast (a who’s who of the industry including Louis Koo, Gordon Lam, Michael Wong, Lo Hoi Pang and Liu Kai Chi).But as the opening minutes quickly reveal, one should severely scale down your expectations if you don’t intend to be frustrated by it. Right from the get-go, there is clearly something off with Wong Ho-Wah’s script as well as David Lam’s (who also receives a story credit) direction. Both have largely been absent from the filmmaking circle since the late 1990s (their last collaboration was an utterly mediocre film in 1998 called ‘The Magnificent Team’ starring Francis Ng and Amanda Lee), and it seems have fallen gravely out of touch with even making a decent film.Beginning with an extended prologue that plays like a recap at the start of an episode of a TVB drama, we are fleetingly introduced to the superintendent of the Commercial Crime Bureau Wong Man Bin (Gordon Lam), who in a raid on an office abets an accountant Law Tak Wing (Lo Hoi Pang) in disposing crucial evidence that could implicate him and many others in financial fraud. Man Bin comes to the attention of the ICAC when his wife goes to the latter with evidence of his possession of a large sum of cash in a black bag upon his return from Macau. That immediately piques the attention of ICAC Principal Investigator William Luk (Louis Koo), who promptly instructs his team to bring Man Bin in for questioning.Wong’s interrogation is the sole highlight of the first half hour of the film, where he promptly calls William’s teammates (Stephen Au and Derek Tsang) out for having but only circumstantial evidence of his alleged corruption. Other than that, and right up till William realises he is going up against the likes of two high-powered politicians (Alfred Cheung and May Law in guest roles), the film flits from scene to scene with nary any care for continuity; in fact, we’d go so far as to say that it doesn’t even bother with establishing a single compelling sequence, disguising its incompetence with an urgent but ultimately silly momentum and an awfully cringe-worthy score that knows no subtlety.By the time the ICAC christens the titular operation, your patience would probably have been worn thin, but any hope that things will pick up are just as quickly dashed. The needlessly convoluted story further introduces Michael Wong as a shady lawyer Malcolm Wu doing the dirty deeds for a George Soros-type character, using Dada Chan’s cancer survivor Angel Leung as a pawn to hook Lo and Felix Lok’s high-ranking civil servant into his Ponzi scheme under the ‘Z Fund’ – hence the name of the operation if you’re wondering. And yet these subplots add little to the central story of the ICAC versus Wu and Co., serving only to pad the runtime so that the climax can unfold on the day the fund is supposed to be listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKSE).If the story is too scattered for its own good, the characters fare even worse. Koo’s dogged personality is attributed to the unfortunate death of his wife from a lift accident a few years back, one of the many melodramatic backstories established in a flashback that feels utterly forced and contrived. The rest of the characters are even less defined – we are supposed to infer that greed is the motivation for Man Bin’s corruption, obligatory gratitude as the reason for Angel’s predicament, and well spousal love for why Tak Wing turned rogue – and not one of them go beyond the one-liner that would have been used to summarise them in a storyboard.The same can be said of the obligatory action scenes, which are choreographed with as little flair as the rest of the movie. The vehicular chase you see in the trailer is but the only one that appears in the entire movie, which comes to an anticlimactic stop when the baddies back off after spotting a police roadblock. A shootout that follows shortly after is played out in terrible lighting and ends in terribly clichéd fashion. We know the ICAC aren’t exactly the SWAT, but that is no excuse for the sloppily conceived action, which rings smack of the kind of the slapdash filmmaking which the glut of 90s Hong Kong films were guilty of.Indeed, the association is deliberate. Though blessed with a big budget, ‘Z Storm’ squanders what potential it has and what vested expectation we have with a shoddy script that is made even worse by Lam’s amateurish direction. Lam’s experience with ICAC-themed material notwithstanding, this wholly ill-conceived attempt to extol the virtues of the agency is a terrible misfire on every level, and could not come at a worse time when the anti-graft organisation is in real life struggling to regain its own reputation after a scandal involving its former chief. Contrary to its title therefore, there is no storm, not even a squall to speak of here, only a rumble that ends in a whimper.